Skip to main content

About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
CSPAN
Feb 25, 2013 12:00am EST
and somehow the public is moving in in strange ways. it used to be said that books were written for the general reader. now they're written by the general reader. [laughter] >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> on route 66, you know, people or were traveling, either traveling for fun or traveling looking for a job, maybe they were on their way to the grand canyon, maybe they were on their way to work in the agricultural fields in california. so at first route 66 was just a way to get somewhere. you know, i mean, your destination was out in california. but later on after all these snake pits started blossoming up and all these tourist traps and attractions and the cafÉs and the motels and the trading posts with the indian trading posts, when those things started springing up, it almost became like a big amusement park along route 66, and route 66 became the destination. it was not like, dad, can we go to the beach in california, it was more like, dad, let's go down route 66, because all the fun stuff is there. it's like a big, long amusement park. >> get
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 12:00pm EST
they just gave me a worldview that made sense of a business is actually doing what i was doing us a business person. >> host: you come to capitalism and no now understand these ideas like exchange and profit and help society. what is conscious capitalism and how does it differ from many of us would call plain old wonderful capitalism? >> guest: first thing is we think business is great value, but it can be better. it has greater potential ben's been realized. when you understand the gallup poll that shows big business in the united states has an approval rating of 19%, 81% don't approve of business. even congress is at 17%, which is about the same level. you realize people have less confidence in business. a narrative about business and capitalism has been controlled are the enemies of business and capitalism. if you study history, you'll see businesspeople have always been held in disdain. a lot of business wasn't done by the elites. the elites who are both common trade and business system that often fell in the shoulders of minorities, such as in the west jewish and that use chene
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 9:00pm EST
that helps society. what is conscious capitalism and how does it differ from what many of us would call plain old wonderful capitalism? >> guest: first to understand we think business is good. and it's has a great value but it can be better. it has a greater potential that is realized. and when you understand when you look at the gallup poll for example, it shows big business in the united states has an approval rating of 19%, 81% do not approve of business. when you see that even in the congress is 17%, which is about the same level only a couple of points below, you realize that people have lost confidence in business. and then narrative about business and capitalism has really been controlled by the enemies of business and capitalism. if you study history you will see business people have always been held in sustained throughout of history if a lot of business wasn't done by the elite, they were done by common trade and business was something that fell on the shoulders of minorities such as the west and in the east the chinese who through hard work and enterprise often made a su
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 12:00pm EST
approach? that seems to me that could return us back to the 1954 mind set of saying, you know, we're going to hold on to failing schools, pre-1954, mind you, hold on to failing schools so say we have our own stuff, say we have a nationalist posture that, ire irrespective of the outcome for the kids. >> reporter: yeah, i agree. i was telling the people whose stories have not been told and whose perspectives have not been out there. i agree. i think it's a really difficult question to say, you know, do we -- it's a question we deal with now. do you close the school down because it's failing or because it doesn't have enough students or because it's, you know, test scores are low, or do we, you know, try and keep it together even though it's -- even though those things are happening for the sake of the community, and i think it's a really difficult balance, and i don't actually have the answer to that. sorry, but >> host: no, no, noun of us do; right? i think what's interesting in the real virtual of the book which i think is amazingly written, amazing well written is you chronicalled t
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2013 8:00pm EST
life and better because of the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred in this country and i don't know, guess we can start at the beginning because at the beginning of the book you are on the mall was dr. king and you're the end of the book you are on the mall again, 50 years later, with his monument which you helped to design. >> guest: and in between coming back for many times on an important occasion to the mall. it seems like even though i lived in washington for a short time, the mall seemed to be a place that had such great symbolic meaning for my life. >> host: and sentimental. >> guest: and sentimental. every time mike come back i have all these memories. >> host: you were 19 years old in 1963 and you are on the mall in the march in washington where dr. king gave that iconic speech, gates -- i have a dream. how did you happen to go there? >> guest: part of of it was i grew up in a small town where there weren't very many black people. they were three black families growing up in southern new mexico so i was fascinated by what was the black community like and i didn't
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 10:00pm EST
number is 1.93. the golden number for us the golden in all demographics would be 2.1. 2.1 is the replacement rate and in order for society to maintain its population average woman has to have 2.1 children over the course of her lifetime. if the average woman has more children than that the size of the population grows and if she is fewer than that in overtime the population contracts. >> host: now has this been going on and you mention 1970 but to some extent the process has been going on for centuries the fact that birthrates birthrates have gone down. >> guest: you see the first good data on fertility rates comes in the 1800's and from all that is happen you are able to see the fertility rates declining and by the time we hit the second world war we were right around 2.1 or 2.2 and then immediately after the second world war we had the only major instance of an increase in the fertility rates in the entire country's history and that is the baby bombers. everybody knows about the baby boomers. it really was a remarkable moment because not only did the fertility rate freeze quite
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2013 8:00pm EST
down the line. most of us are not financial equivalents. >> host: that is true. you also mention that a generation or two ago, we had some of the same concerns that we have today. two thirds of people 30 years ago had fixed pensions provided by their employers, and now two thirds of us at best have access to 401k plans. employee sponsored other than employer-sponsored. >> guest: yes, i would like to go to one other thing first. the idea but this becomes so complicated. i was born in the mid-1960s. credit cards were less than 10 years old. a married woman had no access to credit cards. the idea that i would have access to it would be absurd. there were no adjustable rate mortgages. there were no retirement accounts. this whole structure that we take for granted simply did not exist. so we were expected, but the retirement becomes an issue. we are in the late 1970s. this is something related to social security, helping people save money per year. and then followed by the 401k, and if you want to talk about that, i can. >> host: yes, please. >> guest: okay, the 401k developed becaus
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 9:00pm EST
dollars go to harvard or yale, you don't believe in food stamps that can be used or redeemed any store you go to and medicare is not just a public hospitals. the idea we just can do that with public education is hypocrisy. but people make the argument we shouldn't take the money out of the system but take that money and invest in the failing schools to make them better. this makes no sense because we don't use that logic in any other part of our life. if you went to a dry cleaner down the street and of every 10 shirts seven came back with a burn mark what would you do? you would stop going what is the people said you cannot stop giving us your business because we need your money to invest in new equipment to train our employees and if you take your business the way we cannot do that. what would you say? you would say now with my shirts. if we're willing to take that much care with our laundry shouldn't we take at least that much care with our kids and not be willing to say let's continue to invest in the things that has failed and hope that maybe someday it might get better but meanwhi
CSPAN
Feb 11, 2013 12:00am EST
, and we can get into why that might be the case, if it served any useful purpose, but i think the most important thing to realize is intellectuals are not the friends of business, and not in the past, and certainly not today. so business is painted as fundamentally all about money. selfish, greedy, it's exploitative, and it only exists to make money. and i think it's -- if you go to a cocktail party and ask somebody randomly, hwa what is the purpose of business, people will give you an odd look. they'll probably say, that's -- what you mean? the purpose of business is to make money. but that's an odd answer. if you ask a doctor, what their purpose is, they are well compensated and also need to make money but won't say, well, my purpose as a doctor is to make money. a doctor heals people. teachers educate, architect design building, engineerings construct things, gorgeousists hopefully are helping to uncover the truth. >> host: we try. >> guest: yes, the potentially have a higher purpose of discovering what has been hidden away and bringing it to light and giving it a good interest
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 9:00pm EST
return us back to the 1954 mind-set of saying we are going to hold on to the schools just so we can say we have our own stuff and the national list kind of posture irrespective of what the outcome is. >> guest: i agree. i was telling the story of people who haven't been told or whose perspectives are not out there. it's a difficult question to say it's a question and we are dealing with now. can you close the school now because it doesn't have enough students and the test scores are low or to try to keep it together even though those things are happening for the sake of the community, and i think that it's a difficult balance and i actually don't have the answer. >> host: one of the virtues of the book that is amazingly well written is to chronicle the perspective and highlight this perspective but you also help us track of the activists are engaged in the pushback and the victories are celebrated but people get a sense of the footprint, what it takes to get their. these activists were ultimately to advance a legal argument for the entire country, not just -- how do they do it? >> g
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 12:00pm EST
number be? america right now, for instance, that number is 1.93. the golden number for us, the golden number in all demographics is 2.1. it's the replacement rate. in order for society to maintain the population. the average woman has two have 2.1 children over the course of her lifetime. if they have more than that. the society's population grows. if she has fewer then over time the population contracts and dismirning. -- diminishing. >> to some extend the process has been going on for centuries. the fact that birthrates have been going down. >> right. you could see in america the first good data it comes in 1800. from almost the founding you are able to see the fertility rates declining. by the time we hit the second world war we were around the replacement rate of 2.1. 2.2. immediately after the second world war we had the only major increase in fertility rate. that was the only one in history, that's the baby boom. that's the term that hit us, everybody knows about it. it was a remarkingble moment, not only did it increase quite, it went as high as 3.7, i think, for white a
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 12:00am EST
: none of us do. but i think what's interesting, one of the real virtues of the book which is amazingly written, is you chronicle this perspective. you highlight this perspective, but you also help us track how the activists engaged in the pushback. often times i think the victory -- these victories are celebrated but people don't really get a sense of the footprint, what steps they took to get there talk about that. these activists that pushed to save central and advanced the legal argument, shifted the tide for the entire country. how did they do it? >> guest: well, there was really a bunch of very interesting and eclectic people but they came at it from different -- very different places. although a lot of them had been friends from -- one of them was a very gregarious football coach and he had been a gadfly, and had writtennedder toals to the newspaper, and they kind of knew what they were doing when it came to community activism. another had been part of the black nationalist movement in the '70s and was involved in that. so they'd grown up from that and they were of the civil righ
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 9:00pm EST
come from people that came before us you begin to understand the traits we have about consumption that's understanding the news as a form of entertainment and these are radical notions from his time that we inherited and had taken on to build our society. the other thing that is important and we need to think about it in the changes going on camera over and over again the newspaper business is not just a business. it's to public-service aspect of a democracy cannot function without an informed public that somebody has to be at the school board meeting at 2:00 in the morning to who is going to build the next school and as the press shrinks' today there are no people at those meetings keeping an eye on things and they like the darkest recesses of our society. we know about the hardships about poverty whether we want to or not. we know about corruption and the government because of the press and we know what is on the public agenda and sometimes too much like the fiscal cliff we hear about over and over again that these are important roles and pulitzer's story is a reminder of that t
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 11:00am EST
often undercut the financial security of those using them. this is about an hour. >> host: i enjoyed your book quite a bit. >> guest: thank you so much. >> host: i look for to discussing it. it was a very pleasurable read. very easy to read. and i was caught by the subtitle, exposing the dark side of a personal finance industry, which later in the book you called the personal finance and is a complex, which includes not a investment banks and brokers and financial planners, but also the financial media. seminar leaders, newsletter publishers. even include yourself in that, as a former columnist for the "l.a. times." you did their money makeover column. you include yourself as part of this complex, and you point out i think with some guilt that you are responsible for giving people an illusion of control. you talk about that throughout the book the what do you mean by that? >> guest: i'm going to backtrack. personal-finance starts in the 1930s with sylvia porter. and it's really a spinoff at of the self-help business of the 1930s to the 1930s are known for everything from hard economi
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 10:00pm EST
target. . . basically all powerful when he chooses to use it. they can do what they wish but again tethered to the religious and the need to retain their approval from the religious establishment. because, when the first brother succeeded sowed in 1953 and he and his second brother basically quarreled for 10 years because the new king bankrupt the country and in the end, the family decided we ought to get rid of him and take king faisal and the religious establishment was in essence called and to bless them. so i think a lot of royal realize you always need to be able to be in the good graces of the religious establishment. you might need them one day, against each other. not just to help you with the people. we have to go but i thank you all very much. [applause] >> up next on booktv "after words" with this weeks guest host said three of fortune magazine. this week former ceo of at&t ed whitacre discusses his book "american turnaround" reinventing at&t and gm and the way we do business in the usa. in the book he tells the story of rising through the ranks of business to lead one o
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2013 10:00pm EST
conscious capitalism and how does it differ from what many of us would call just plain old wonderful capitalism? >> guest: well, the first thing to understand is that we think business is good and it's a direct value but it can be better. it has greater potential than is being realized and when you understand any look at the gallup pole for example that shows that the business in the united states has an approval rating of 19%, 81% don't approve of business and when you see that in congress is at 17% which is about the same level, only a couple of points below it, you realize that people have lost confidence in business. the narrative about business and capitalism have really been controlled by the entities of business of capitalism and if you study history you will see the business people have always been able to sustain throughout all history. a lot of business was done by the elites. the elites were above, and trade and business was something often that fell on the shoulders of minorities such as the western jewish and the chinese, who through hard work and through enterprise ofte
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 10:00pm EST
mention of us about these letters and i found it compelling that you start -- tell the story of a girl who dreamed of going to central high school and dreamed of it all 15 years of her life. what she was a essentially told she couldn't go saying the school couldn't have more than 14% african-americans and as a result she was being put on a wait list that might derail her dream of getting a good education and becoming a lawyer. that kind of story was compelling and jarring. how much that came up in your research? are these telling cases or is this just a narrative of the people? >> guest: yeah i think those stories were what made it really interesting and how people felt about central high school. had i seen -- part of it was she wanted to be a lawyer. no wonder the no other school had a law program but it was also very emotional familial connection. her dad had gone there and her mom had gone there and you know it was the black school for decades and decades. so people had a very emotional connection to it, and sought is a very good school and it was a very good school at the time
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17